Realism with an edge. David Michael Bowers

Realism with an edge. David Michael Bowers

Фотореалистичные картины художника Дэвида Майкла Бауэрса

Дэвид Майкл Бауэрс один из интереснейших современных американских художников сюрреалистов, родился в 1956 году в Соединенных штатах Америки в городе Чемберсбург. Закончив Питтсбургскую художественную школу в городе, поступил на работу, в Питтсбургских студиях, на должности штатный художник ,через два года он начинает вести курс «изобразительного искусства в институте Питтсбурга, где преподавал в течении десяти лет. Одновременно он работает и как иллюстратор, занимаясь оформлением книг и журналов, именно как иллюстратор он получает известность и множество наград, но в 2004 году художник решает оставить успешную карьеру и останавливается на изобразительном искусстве.

В настоящее время художник проживает в Майдера Бич штате Калифорния, а многие его картины находятся в частных коллекциях Соединенных Штатах Америки, Европы, также его работы можно увидеть в «музее Иллюстрации» в городе Нью-Йорке и в Вашингтоне в «Национальной портретной галерее».

Техника исполнения его работ довольно оригинальна, при написании картины наноситься несколько слоёв краски, а сверху картина покрывается специальным лаком, это придаёт картине эффект глянца и зеркальность.

Часто художник использует работы голландцев семнадцатого века, вот так например в картине Лицо света художник поместил фигуру явно современную женщины в старинном платье с современным альбомом на столе

Но есть другие картины, которые сам Дэвида Бауэрса относят к сюрреалистам, но сам он направление своих работ называет «realism with an edge» (дословный перевод реализм с некоторым краем). Что имеет своё основание, так как многие его работы, балансируют на гране и вызывают отвращение. Но в то же время автор показывает пороки современного общества как например в работе Amazing Race (сумасшедшие гонки). Персонажи картины изображены в пейзаже голландских мастеров, при этом передний персонаж картины отсылает к журналу. А сидящий на черепахе голый мужчина в ковбойской шляпе, также вызывает отвращение. Кажется автор воплощает свои фантазии с одной стороны, вызывая отвращение, но при это подобно Босху пытается вывести на всеобщее обозрение пороки общества.

AMERICAN GALLERY – 21st Century

David Michael Bowers (1956)

12 Monday Jan 2015

Tags

The Girl In The Blue Kimono

The Girl In The Blue Kimono II

State Of The Nation

Finding The Gold

Heart Throb – Suzie’s Solution

Three Rings or USDA

The Emasculation Of David

The Amazing Race

Made In America

Girl At The Window

The Unresponsive Audience

Blondes Have More Fun

The Last Supper

The Golden Years

Paul Green & Katy

Flirt With Death

The Observer (Self Portrait)

© David Michael Bowers

Share this:

Post navigation

1 thought on “David Michael Bowers (1956)”

There are some very fascinating images here. You know me, I must comment!

The kimono paintings are beautiful, particularly “The Girl In The Blue Kimono II.” That one is a keeper, for sure.

“State of the Nation” is very sad, indeed. Imagine looking at a TV like that one! Pitiful. By the way the dog has to go, badly!

“Unspoiled” and “Safe Sex” – don’t forget to Saran wrap your heart as well.

Interesting concept in “Finding The Gold” – would the air pocket at the top of the fish bowl be preserved by the shape of the bowl under water? This painting is fishy in that regard.

“Heart Throb – Suzie’s Solution” – better Saran wrap that heart, young lady!

“Three Rings or USDA” reminds me of Lady Gaga’s meat dress. The artist has no steak in vegetarianism, apparently.

“Ship of Fools” is a classic, merely for including the political donkey and elephant. Priceless. Who are the other folks, I wonder?

Wow, what to think of “The Gift”? Which one is the gift? Does she have a knife like the puppet? Truly bizarre and disturbing.

“The Emasculation Of David” – I’m not sure I want to know what is going on here. That hammer . . . I am cringing as I type.

“Paulina’s Dream” reminds me of Miss Havisham in “Great Expectations.”

“White Meat” – clean up that turkey poop!

Yes, it truly is a an “Amazing [Human] Race.” I often comment upon the low standards of women in their choice of men, without which the human race would have died out long ago.

That’s a pet peeve of mine in “Made In America.” EVERYTHING is made in China these days, which accounts for “Minimum Wage.” Much of our ballyhooed job growth in the past year of two has been in part-time, low-wage jobs because many good ones have been moved overseas.

“Broken” – what is the story here? That’s why this artwork is fascinating. It makes you look at every detail, looking for clues, and you are not even annoyed when there is no answer! Ditto for “The Unresponsive Audience” (kindly hold your “applause,” heh) and “Blondes Have More Fun” (baby don’t WANT his bottle).

Читать еще:  Jeffrey Thomas. Диснеевские зомби-принцессы

Uh-oh, the name of the painting is “The Ham,” not “The Pig.” Guess he’s not going to be a pig much longer.

“Pig Walker” – nice hambonnet especially if you are a hambone. By the way, this painting should be R-rated due to that nonsense going on in the background.

I like the women in “Pig Walker II and III”! Mmmmm, zoftig and holding the leash!

They certainly are “The Golden Years” if you are still smiling like that lady.

“On The Clock” but no customers? Business looks to be slow. Maybe it’s Super Bowl Sunday?

She may “Flirt With Death” but old boney is no gentleman. Hey Slim! Get off your pelvis bone and let the lady sit!

“The Observer (Self Portrait) – well done, sir. You have great talent.

David Michael Bowers

David Bowers was born in 1956 in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania and graduated from art school in Pittsburgh in 1979. He began working as a staff artist at various studios in the Pittsburgh, PA area. Two years later, David began teaching his craft at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh where he lectured for ten years and was honored as the Keynote Speaker for the Class of 2003.

In 1991, David began his illustration career working mostly with book publishers in New York City in which he completed over one hundred book covers in the span of over ten years. David’s work graced the cover of numerous prominent magazines, including TIME. He also painted the portrait of J. P. Morgan for the cover of Cigar Aficionado, as well as the family portrait of the Rothschild family and the Chateau Latour Winery for the covers of Wine Spectator magazines. These paintings are now part of the publishing company’s permanent collection at their corporate headquarters in NYC. Bowers’ illustrations received numerous awards including three Joseph Morgan Henniger Awards, “Best of Show” from the Society of Illustrators of Los Angeles along with two Patrick Nagel awards. These awards recognized David with the best, published illustration of the year. David received nine other medals recognizing his work from that organization. David also received numerous medals and Merit awards from the Society of Illustrators in New York, Spectrum’s Best of Fantastic Art and Communications Arts Magazine.

As David transitioned into Fine Art, his work continues to be recognized by various organizations including the “Best of Show” from the American Society of Traditional Artists in 2014, the “Jack Buncher Award” from the Carnegie Museum of Art in 2013, the “Best of Show” in 2011, “The Best Tromp L’oeil” in 2010 and “Pioneer in Realism” award in 2009 from the International Guild of Realism. David was recognized by The Art Renewal Center with the “Chairman’s Choice Award” in 2013 along with the “Staff Award” in 2011 and in 2009 recognized as a “Living Master.” David’s painting titled, “Made In America” received the 1st place award from The Portrait Society of America in 2011. Bowers was a semifinalist for the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition in 2009, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Bowers has had exhibitions across America and Europe, including the Mendenhall Gallery in Pasadena, CA, Gallerie 224 in Laguna Beach, CA, Klaudia Marr Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico, 101 Exhibit in Miami, FL and Los Angeles, CA, Gallery Brusen in Denmark, Halcyon Gallery in London, England, Marcel Salome Gallery in The Netherlands and Germany, the Butler Institute of American Art, The Westmoreland Museum of American Art and is currently being represented by Palm Avenue Fine Art in Sarasota, FL, Gallery 1261 in Denver, Co, Ric Michel Fine Art, NYC and most recently Winfield Gallery in Carmel, CA.

Upon first glance, Bowers’ work seems to take you back to periods of painting long gone. This is due to Bowers method of painting, which is reminiscent of the Old Masters, specifically the 17th Century Dutch. David has studied the masters for many years to develop his techniques, which involves multiple layers called glazing and alla prima. The technique might be old, but his paintings incorporate modern themes and current symbolism, which he describes as “realism with an edge.”

Читать еще:  Kurt Anderson. Цветочные картины

Bowers’ paintings are in many private collections throughout the United States and Europe as well as The Museum of American Illustration in New York and the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

Bowers lives in the Pittsburgh and Clearwater Beach area with his wife Kimberlie, where he paints very meticulously and methodically day in and day out!

AMERICAN GALLERY – 21st Century

David Michael Bowers (1956)

12 Monday Jan 2015

Tags

The Girl In The Blue Kimono

The Girl In The Blue Kimono II

State Of The Nation

Finding The Gold

Heart Throb – Suzie’s Solution

Three Rings or USDA

The Emasculation Of David

The Amazing Race

Made In America

Girl At The Window

The Unresponsive Audience

Blondes Have More Fun

The Last Supper

The Golden Years

Paul Green & Katy

Flirt With Death

The Observer (Self Portrait)

© David Michael Bowers

Share this:

Post navigation

1 thought on “David Michael Bowers (1956)”

There are some very fascinating images here. You know me, I must comment!

The kimono paintings are beautiful, particularly “The Girl In The Blue Kimono II.” That one is a keeper, for sure.

“State of the Nation” is very sad, indeed. Imagine looking at a TV like that one! Pitiful. By the way the dog has to go, badly!

“Unspoiled” and “Safe Sex” – don’t forget to Saran wrap your heart as well.

Interesting concept in “Finding The Gold” – would the air pocket at the top of the fish bowl be preserved by the shape of the bowl under water? This painting is fishy in that regard.

“Heart Throb – Suzie’s Solution” – better Saran wrap that heart, young lady!

“Three Rings or USDA” reminds me of Lady Gaga’s meat dress. The artist has no steak in vegetarianism, apparently.

“Ship of Fools” is a classic, merely for including the political donkey and elephant. Priceless. Who are the other folks, I wonder?

Wow, what to think of “The Gift”? Which one is the gift? Does she have a knife like the puppet? Truly bizarre and disturbing.

“The Emasculation Of David” – I’m not sure I want to know what is going on here. That hammer . . . I am cringing as I type.

“Paulina’s Dream” reminds me of Miss Havisham in “Great Expectations.”

“White Meat” – clean up that turkey poop!

Yes, it truly is a an “Amazing [Human] Race.” I often comment upon the low standards of women in their choice of men, without which the human race would have died out long ago.

That’s a pet peeve of mine in “Made In America.” EVERYTHING is made in China these days, which accounts for “Minimum Wage.” Much of our ballyhooed job growth in the past year of two has been in part-time, low-wage jobs because many good ones have been moved overseas.

“Broken” – what is the story here? That’s why this artwork is fascinating. It makes you look at every detail, looking for clues, and you are not even annoyed when there is no answer! Ditto for “The Unresponsive Audience” (kindly hold your “applause,” heh) and “Blondes Have More Fun” (baby don’t WANT his bottle).

Uh-oh, the name of the painting is “The Ham,” not “The Pig.” Guess he’s not going to be a pig much longer.

“Pig Walker” – nice hambonnet especially if you are a hambone. By the way, this painting should be R-rated due to that nonsense going on in the background.

I like the women in “Pig Walker II and III”! Mmmmm, zoftig and holding the leash!

They certainly are “The Golden Years” if you are still smiling like that lady.

“On The Clock” but no customers? Business looks to be slow. Maybe it’s Super Bowl Sunday?

She may “Flirt With Death” but old boney is no gentleman. Hey Slim! Get off your pelvis bone and let the lady sit!

“The Observer (Self Portrait) – well done, sir. You have great talent.

How the Groundbreaking Realism Movement Revolutionized Art History

In the middle of the 19th century, artists in Europe adopted a new style of art: Realism. Characterized by unprecedented attention to everyday subject matter, this art movement transformed the western art world.

Though, today, this interest in ordinary iconography may not seem noteworthy, it marked a major shift in the history of art. Here, we explore the contributions of its pioneers in order to understand just why it was so significant.

Читать еще:  Hsin Yao Tseng. Масляная живопись

What is Realism?

Realism emerged in France in the 1850s. On the heels of the 1848 Revolution—an event that established the “right to work” in the country—the movement introduced the idea of average, working class people, contemporary settings, and day-to-day scenes as worthy artistic subjects.

Jean-François Millet, “The Gleaners” (1857) (Photo: Google Arts & Culture via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Artists working in the Realist style rejected the standards of Romanticism (1800-1850), a genre defined by a heightened sense of emotion. Typically, Romantic paintings feature either mythological figures or sublime scenes of nature. In either case, it glorifies its subjects—a trait that Realist artists directly dismissed.

Important Realist Artists

Gustave Courbet, “The Stone Breakers” (1849) (Photo: The Yorck Project via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Gustave Courbet

Gustave Courbet is often considered the leading figure of Realism. He laid the groundwork for the movement in the 1840s, when he began portraying peasants and laborers on a grand scale typically reserved for religious, historical, or allegorical subjects.

Prior to Courbet’s radical emergence, painters did not depict scenes as they saw them; instead, they idealized them, virtually erasing any flaws or imperfections. To Courbet, this approach was detrimental to painting, as it eliminated any sense of individuality. “It is society at its best, its worst, its average,” he said of his practice. “In short, it’s my way of seeing society with all its interests and passions. It’s the whole world coming to me to be painted.”

Jean-François Millet, “Man with a Hoe” (ca. 1860-1862) (Photo: Google Arts & Culture via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Jean-François Millet

Like Courbet, Jean-François Millet also opted to feature working class people in his paintings. As he was based in rural France, he repeatedly returned to farmers as his subject-of-choice. “Peasant subjects suit my nature best,” he said, “for I must confess . . . that the human side is what touches me most in art.”

In addition to being a premier Realist painter, Millet is also known for his role in founding the Barbizon school—a group of artists who came together to challenge the dominance of Romanticism.

Honoré Daumier, “The Third-Class Carriage” (ca. 1862-1864) (Photo: Google Arts & Culture via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Honoré Daumier

Honoré Daumier was painter, printmaker, sculptor, and caricaturist who used his talents to boldly comment on the politics of contemporary France.

Unlike the work of Courbet and Millet, Daumier’s art—namely, his political cartoons—often showcases subjective and exaggerated undertones. Nevertheless, his oeuvre offers an eye-opening glimpse into the nitty-gritty of life in 19th century France.

Rosa Bonheur, “Ploughing in Nevers” (1849) (Photo: Google Arts & Culture via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Rosa Bonheur

Rosa Bonheur specialized in animal depictions. Given this interest, many of her paintings are set in farms, fields, and other countryside settings.

Today, Bonheur is often considered the most prolific female painter of the 19th century. One of her most well-known paintings, Ploughing in the Nivernais, won first prize at the French Salon of 1848 and has since been praised as a key piece of the Realist movement.

Édouard Manet “The Old Musician” (1862) (Photo: The Yorck Project via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Édouard Manet

Though often studied in the context of Impressionism, Édouard Manet also played a pivotal role in Realism. In fact, the painter acted as a bridge between the movements, inspiring the Impressionist interest in capturing “impressions” of everyday life.

“When you look at it,” he remarked about his ordinary subject matter, “and above all, when you see how to render it as you see it, thats is, in such a way that its make the same impression on the viewer as it does on you.”

As a result of Realism’s success in Europe, American artists adopted the approach shortly after its emergence. Its influence is particularly evident in Thomas Eakins’ unidealized portraits, Edward Hopper’s revealing studies of modern city life, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler’s body of “art for art’s sake.”

Edward Hopper, “Nighthawks” (1942)(Photo: Art Institute Chicago via Wikimedia Commons Public Domain)

Additionally, Realism directly inspired prominent contemporary art movements, including Photorealism and Hyperrealism. Building on Realism’s remarkably modern focus, these genres demonstrate the enduring and evolving legacy of the groundbreaking movement.

Ссылка на основную публикацию
Adblock
detector