Язык без слов. Helene Delmaire

Язык без слов. Helene Delmaire

Язык без слов. Helene Delmaire

You’ve probably spotted her hand in the aforementioned film directed by Céline Sciamma, maybe even paused to scrutinize the finer details of her paintings. But do you know about her time studying realism in Florence, her idea of beauty, and what monks and screaming monkeys have to do with it all? Then keep reading.

There were no schools in France that taught realism. So I went there, to a 19th-century-style atelier. I lived the life of a monk, really. It was a private school and I wanted to go through it as fast as I could because it was a big financial strain on my parents, so I just worked a lot and was too exhausted to do much else.
There were no exams; only teachers who made you advance through the programme when they felt you had mastered the necessary skills. I grew by leaps and bounds technically and built up self-confidence, but people there were extremely reactionary and believed art had died in 1915. It was a bizarre experience. The city itself was beautiful though and ice cream tubs at gelaterias were half priced from November to March. We used to gorge on it while doing speed drawing contests.

It’s seen as a welcome change by women. My audience is ¾ feminine. I sometimes wonder to what extent I have internalized the male gaze in the way I represent female bodies but I strive to make them subjects and not objects. I want my paintings to have strong agency. I want to transform attributes that are traditionally viewed as weaknesses into symbols of power. I think many women relate to that.

I think people who view humans as the only interesting thing on earth are the embodiment of the rut we’re stuck in as a species right now. We’ve made the mistake of forgetting we are interdependent, and the effects are showing. Anthropocentrism is a disease that is today in its terminal phase. A human is no more or less beautiful or important than a mosquito or an oak tree. Maybe we should get those people to try magic mushrooms and see what they have been missing out on.

I felt a lot more naked painting for the film than I did posing. Being a model is a great time to get new ideas. You’re both fully in your body as your muscles ache and you strive to keep your balance, and away as your mind is free to wander for half an hour with nothing else to do. I’ve had many ideas for paintings this way. I miss these out-of-time physical meditations to the point I’ve been considering modelling again just for them.
Shooting Portrait of a Lady on Fire was a lot more intense as I was actively working and it was in front of an objective camera, not subjective eyes. Instead of twelve people doing various interpretations of my body, I was doing the one interpretation of somebody else’s in someone else’s style, and there was only one take, so I had to learn to accept that if I painted something ugly – and I did many times – people were going to see it with surgical clarity. Only the crew though, as they mostly kept the good stuff when editing. But I still cringe at some of it when I see the film.

I have a solo show lined up for early 2021 in Northern France, but this year I’m focusing on pushing my style and getting out of my comfort zone. I’ve been meaning to let my work become more political for a while now but I’m still playing with what shape it might end up taking. It’s easy to become cheesy or simply illustrative. I want to do fundraisers for Extinction Rebellion and paint angry monkeys. I’m not sure how realistic that is. I still like naked women and sad people though.

Язык без слов. Helene Delmaire

You’ve probably spotted her hand in the aforementioned film directed by Céline Sciamma, maybe even paused to scrutinize the finer details of her paintings. But do you know about her time studying realism in Florence, her idea of beauty, and what monks and screaming monkeys have to do with it all? Then keep reading.

There were no schools in France that taught realism. So I went there, to a 19th-century-style atelier. I lived the life of a monk, really. It was a private school and I wanted to go through it as fast as I could because it was a big financial strain on my parents, so I just worked a lot and was too exhausted to do much else.
There were no exams; only teachers who made you advance through the programme when they felt you had mastered the necessary skills. I grew by leaps and bounds technically and built up self-confidence, but people there were extremely reactionary and believed art had died in 1915. It was a bizarre experience. The city itself was beautiful though and ice cream tubs at gelaterias were half priced from November to March. We used to gorge on it while doing speed drawing contests.

It’s seen as a welcome change by women. My audience is ¾ feminine. I sometimes wonder to what extent I have internalized the male gaze in the way I represent female bodies but I strive to make them subjects and not objects. I want my paintings to have strong agency. I want to transform attributes that are traditionally viewed as weaknesses into symbols of power. I think many women relate to that.

I think people who view humans as the only interesting thing on earth are the embodiment of the rut we’re stuck in as a species right now. We’ve made the mistake of forgetting we are interdependent, and the effects are showing. Anthropocentrism is a disease that is today in its terminal phase. A human is no more or less beautiful or important than a mosquito or an oak tree. Maybe we should get those people to try magic mushrooms and see what they have been missing out on.

I felt a lot more naked painting for the film than I did posing. Being a model is a great time to get new ideas. You’re both fully in your body as your muscles ache and you strive to keep your balance, and away as your mind is free to wander for half an hour with nothing else to do. I’ve had many ideas for paintings this way. I miss these out-of-time physical meditations to the point I’ve been considering modelling again just for them.
Shooting Portrait of a Lady on Fire was a lot more intense as I was actively working and it was in front of an objective camera, not subjective eyes. Instead of twelve people doing various interpretations of my body, I was doing the one interpretation of somebody else’s in someone else’s style, and there was only one take, so I had to learn to accept that if I painted something ugly – and I did many times – people were going to see it with surgical clarity. Only the crew though, as they mostly kept the good stuff when editing. But I still cringe at some of it when I see the film.

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I have a solo show lined up for early 2021 in Northern France, but this year I’m focusing on pushing my style and getting out of my comfort zone. I’ve been meaning to let my work become more political for a while now but I’m still playing with what shape it might end up taking. It’s easy to become cheesy or simply illustrative. I want to do fundraisers for Extinction Rebellion and paint angry monkeys. I’m not sure how realistic that is. I still like naked women and sad people though.

Artwork by Hélène Delmaire


Watching millions of people across the globe gather to march for women’s rights was incredibly inspiring to me for a wide range of reasons. There were so many wonderful moments of unity and understanding, but there were also moments of conflict, differences of opinion and spaces where real discussions needed to happen about how women communicate with and about each other. It got me thinking a lot about women in fine art — the way we’re depicted and the way we depict ourselves. I’ve been paying a lot of attention to female-identified painters lately and how they choose to depict women in their work. French artist Hélène Delmaire caught my eye last week because her work raises so many questions, at least in my eyes, about the way women are painted and what is revealed or kept covered.



Hélène’s work has such a great sense of texture and color and uses bold, abstract swaths of paint to sometimes cover the figures’ eyes or faces. Her work makes me think about beauty, sexism and the ways in which women are censored or expected to be, act or talk a certain way. From a purely aesthetic standpoint, the color palettes she works in are stunning. I found myself going back to her Instagram feed over and over again to indulge in the rich pinks, purples and greens she uses. You can check out more of Hélène Delmaire’s work online here at her website or here on her Instagram feed (which updates more frequently than her main website). I’d love to hear your take on her work and what it says to you. xo, grace

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There’s something really haunting in the texture of these – so stunning!

I love these! The brushwork is gorgeous. That she couples this lush painterly quality with a sly commentary on the controls society places — or attempts to place — on women is fabulous. Thanks for introducing her work to me.

These are beautiful! Also check out the work of Melora Kuhn – she’s an upstate NY artist (near Hudson) who creates large-scale portraits that are quite striking and thoughtful, and she makes these gorgeous sculptures too. Her studio is open by appointment for those who just want to stop by and check it out, it’s pretty awesome. http://melorakuhn.net/section/431772_Reconstructing_Histories.html

I am expecting the comments to her artwork to be wide and varied, based on an individuals perceptions, life experiences and what they hold dear. Her images bring out a number of responses in me. The first image of the woman with her eyes covered resonates strongly with me as it represents the world we live in. We have eyes to see with but yet mankind chooses to be blind. And every single person, myself included, is guilty of this. There are so many issues facing this beautiful planet that society ignores. We are so busy living our own separate lives that we do not even stop to ponder upon or consider the impact of our daily actions on others or this planet. For me, the environment is a passion as the key foundations for life are quality air, water and soil. Without these, there can be no life. And, sadly, the world has destroyed it’s air, water and soil quality. How many of us even stop to consider the impact that our cleaning products, our cosmetics, our packaging, the way we grow food etc has on our planet. I am a mother and I worry about this beautiful planet that is our home and the inheritance we will leave our children and future children and I fear that the burden that they will have to endure will be great because we have eyes to see with and yet we do not.

Sorry, it was the third image that I spoke about, not the first. Actually, the woman in the first image represents to me a world that is blinded to its problems and the anguish and torment that occur as a result. And, my first reaction to the second image is that of a world drowning. A world engulfed in so many problems that it is struggling to cope and find resolutions. Dark or bleak my responses may be but there are numerous problems that our world faces and often people prefer to be anaesthetised against them – out of sight out of mind.

hey SS, I’m so glad my work evokes this kind of response in you. It’s an issue I’m terribly concerned with and I think a direct cause of these paintings, though they’re a mixture of different feelings.

Her work is so inspiring!

Dear Grace,
your posts are uncredibly inspiring to me. I am French and I did not know about Hélène Delamaire. Thank you!

I have been following your blog for years. Design must fit with the new trends. This what I find here. You do not only “speak about design”, you give a personal view and smart links with our society trends. I also appreciated your posts about the real tips when you manage your own business. When I read your posts, I read sincere feelings and relevant analysis.

Keep inspiring us! Karine, France, Brittany

Artwork by Hélène Delmaire


Watching millions of people across the globe gather to march for women’s rights was incredibly inspiring to me for a wide range of reasons. There were so many wonderful moments of unity and understanding, but there were also moments of conflict, differences of opinion and spaces where real discussions needed to happen about how women communicate with and about each other. It got me thinking a lot about women in fine art — the way we’re depicted and the way we depict ourselves. I’ve been paying a lot of attention to female-identified painters lately and how they choose to depict women in their work. French artist Hélène Delmaire caught my eye last week because her work raises so many questions, at least in my eyes, about the way women are painted and what is revealed or kept covered.

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Hélène’s work has such a great sense of texture and color and uses bold, abstract swaths of paint to sometimes cover the figures’ eyes or faces. Her work makes me think about beauty, sexism and the ways in which women are censored or expected to be, act or talk a certain way. From a purely aesthetic standpoint, the color palettes she works in are stunning. I found myself going back to her Instagram feed over and over again to indulge in the rich pinks, purples and greens she uses. You can check out more of Hélène Delmaire’s work online here at her website or here on her Instagram feed (which updates more frequently than her main website). I’d love to hear your take on her work and what it says to you. xo, grace

Suggested For You

Susan Maddux x All We Ever Wanted

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Interior Murals by Camille Javal

There’s something really haunting in the texture of these – so stunning!

I love these! The brushwork is gorgeous. That she couples this lush painterly quality with a sly commentary on the controls society places — or attempts to place — on women is fabulous. Thanks for introducing her work to me.

These are beautiful! Also check out the work of Melora Kuhn – she’s an upstate NY artist (near Hudson) who creates large-scale portraits that are quite striking and thoughtful, and she makes these gorgeous sculptures too. Her studio is open by appointment for those who just want to stop by and check it out, it’s pretty awesome. http://melorakuhn.net/section/431772_Reconstructing_Histories.html

I am expecting the comments to her artwork to be wide and varied, based on an individuals perceptions, life experiences and what they hold dear. Her images bring out a number of responses in me. The first image of the woman with her eyes covered resonates strongly with me as it represents the world we live in. We have eyes to see with but yet mankind chooses to be blind. And every single person, myself included, is guilty of this. There are so many issues facing this beautiful planet that society ignores. We are so busy living our own separate lives that we do not even stop to ponder upon or consider the impact of our daily actions on others or this planet. For me, the environment is a passion as the key foundations for life are quality air, water and soil. Without these, there can be no life. And, sadly, the world has destroyed it’s air, water and soil quality. How many of us even stop to consider the impact that our cleaning products, our cosmetics, our packaging, the way we grow food etc has on our planet. I am a mother and I worry about this beautiful planet that is our home and the inheritance we will leave our children and future children and I fear that the burden that they will have to endure will be great because we have eyes to see with and yet we do not.

Sorry, it was the third image that I spoke about, not the first. Actually, the woman in the first image represents to me a world that is blinded to its problems and the anguish and torment that occur as a result. And, my first reaction to the second image is that of a world drowning. A world engulfed in so many problems that it is struggling to cope and find resolutions. Dark or bleak my responses may be but there are numerous problems that our world faces and often people prefer to be anaesthetised against them – out of sight out of mind.

hey SS, I’m so glad my work evokes this kind of response in you. It’s an issue I’m terribly concerned with and I think a direct cause of these paintings, though they’re a mixture of different feelings.

Her work is so inspiring!

Dear Grace,
your posts are uncredibly inspiring to me. I am French and I did not know about Hélène Delamaire. Thank you!

I have been following your blog for years. Design must fit with the new trends. This what I find here. You do not only “speak about design”, you give a personal view and smart links with our society trends. I also appreciated your posts about the real tips when you manage your own business. When I read your posts, I read sincere feelings and relevant analysis.

Keep inspiring us! Karine, France, Brittany

Эльфийский язык — фразы:

Andaran atish’an — формальное эльфийское приветствие. Буквально: «Я нахожусь в этом городе, городе мира»
Dareth shiral — Используется в качестве прощания, это означает «счастливого пути».
Ma nuvenin — Как пожелаешь.
Ma serannas — Спасибо.
Sinu a’manore — Приятно тебя видеть.
Shorel’aran — Прощайте.
Shindu fallah na! — Они наступают!
Bal’a dash, malanore — Приветствую, путник.
Anu belore dela’na — Солнце ведет нас.
Anaria shola — Как у тебя дела?
Al diel shala — Успешного пути.
Elen sila lumenn omentilmo — Звезда осветила час нашей встречи!
‘Quel — Добрый (день/утро/ночь/вечер)
Nae saian luume’ — Это было так долго
Cormamin lindua ele lle — Мое сердце поет, глядя на вас.
Saesa omentien lle — Рад встрече с тобой
Sermo nanye! — Я друг!
Eruhantale – Благодарение Эру!
Tancave! – да
Lau! – нет
Ava! — Нет! Не надо!
Ava care! — Не делай этого!
Heca! — Прочь!
Ai! — Увы!
Tira! — Смотри!
Laita! — Прославляй(те)!, Слава!
Ela! — Выражение радости и удивления, (Ух ты!)
Queta! — Говори!

da’assan — короткая стрела.
da’mi — короткий клинок.
da’vhenan — кроткое сердце.
emm’asha — моя девочка.
emma lath — любовь моя.
emma sa’lath — моя единственная любовь.
emma vhenan — сердце мое.
ma’arlath — Я люблю тебя.
ma emma lath — ты моя любовь.
vhenan’ara — желание сердца.
a’maelamin — мой (я) любимый (ая)
a’mael — любимый (ая)
lle naa vanima — ты прекрасна
cormamin — мое сердце

elvhen’alas — грязные эльфы.
len’alas lath’din — грязный, никем не любимый, ребенок.
seth’lin — жидкая кровь.

Ar’din nuvenin na’din. — Я не хочу убивать тебя.
Ar tu na’din. — Я убью тебя.
Ar tu na’lin emma mi. — Я увижу твою кровь на своем клинке.
Emma shem’nan. — Моя месть быстра.
Halam sahlin. — Это закончится сейчас.
Ma emma harel. — Тебе стоит бояться меня.
Ma halam. — Вы закончили.
Bash’a no falor talah! — Испытай холод истинной смерти!

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Kela — Уйдите
Vanya sulie — Волшебных ветров
Namaarie — Прощайте!
Quel fara — Хорошей охоты
Aa’ i’sul nora lanne’lle — Попутного ветра
Aa’ menle nauva calen ar’ ta hwesta e’ ale’quenle — Зеленой дороги и ветра в спину!
Aa’ menealle nauva calen ar’ malta — Пусть твой путь будет покрыт золотом и листвой!
Cormamin niuve tenna’ ta elea lle au’ — Мое сердце будет лить слезы, пока вновь не встретится с тобой!
Quel esta — Хорошо отдохнуть.
Quel kaima — Приятных снов
Lissenen ar’ maska’lalaith tenna’ lye omentuva — Сладкой воды и легкого смеха до нашей следующей встречи.
Tenna’ telwan — Увидимся позже!
Tenna’ ento lye omenta — До следующей встречи
Tenna’ san’ — Увидимся!
Tenna’ tul’re — До завтра!
Nai Anar caluva tielyanna — Пусть Солнце светит над твоей дорогой
Tenn’ omentielvo – До свидания
Tenn’ enomentielvo – Увидимся, до свидания

A linna! — Иди!
Ava linna! — Стой!
A tula enye! — Следуй за мной!
A palpa! — Бей!
A maca! — Руби!
A raama! – Стреляй!
Quingar (macili, pelecqui, eccer) ndacilinna! – Луки (мечи, топоры,копья) к бою!
A qualta ngottoro! – Бей врагов!
Ava care! – Отставить!
Apaire! — Победа!

Elen sila lumen omentielvo – Звезда воссияла в час нашей встречи
Elen sila lumenn’ omentielvo – приятная встреча
Marie! — добрый день
Aiya! — Приветствие! Привет!
Nae saian luume’ — Давно ждал этой встречи
Cormamin lindua ele lle — Сердце поёт при встрече с вами
Saesa omentien lle — Рада видеть вас
Mae govannen — Рада встрече
Laita! — Радуйся! Будь благословен! (примерный перевод)
Aya! — Привет тебе!
Meneg suilaid! — Тысяча приветов!
Mae govannen — Добрая встреча.
Cuio! — Многая лета!
Cuio mae! — Пожелание доброй жизни

Обращение к государю:

Aran — Король или владыка отдельной страны
Aranya — Король мой (обращение)

Обращения к лордам:

Haran — Властитель
Heru, Her — Лорд, Высокий лорд, повелитель
Heri — леди, повелительница
Cano, canu — Военный предводитель, командир
Cundu — принц

Другие возможные вежливые обращения:

callo — герой
Tano — Мастер
Ohtar, mehtar — Воин
Roquen — Победитель, великий воин
Arato — Мудрый
Nolmo — Мастер, искушенный в науках, мудрый
Ingolmo — Великий мудрец
Nilmo — Друг
Nildo — друг мужчина
Nilde — подруга
Arquen — Благородный

Ulundo — извращенец
Uvanimo — нечестивец
Thu — вонючка
Nai linnuvalye Moringotenno? Nai elye linnuva? — А не пошел бы ты к Морготу? Вот именно ты — не пошел бы?
Velanenye elyo tundosse! — Видал я тебя в могильном кургане!
Ambar-metta — конец света
nai undume maluva le_! – да поглотит тебя бездна!
nai nosselya nauva aqua maacina_ – да будет перерезан весь твой род
esselya naa talda luxunen_ – твое имя покрыто грязью

Dolle naa losse — Ваша голова пуста
Amin feuya ten’lle — Вы мне внушаете отвращение
Auta miqula orqu — Идите поцелуйте орка
Nadorhuan — Трусливая собака
Nadorhuan(rim) — Трусливый пёс (псы)
Mereth en draugrim — Сборище волков
Andodulin — Свора стервятников
Auta miqula orqu — Иди поцелуй орка
Amin delotha lle — Я тебя ненавижу
Lasta lalaithamin — Посмотрим, кто посмеётся последним
Antolle ulua sulrim — Много ветра летит из твоего рта
Utinu en lokirim — Змеиный сын (нечестный человек)
Lle naa haran e’ nausalle — Ты король в своём воображении
Amin feuya ten’ lle — Ты отвратителен
Lle holma ve’ edan — Пахнешь подобно человеку
Llie n’vanima ar’ lle atara lanneina — Ты уродлив, а твоя мама одевает тебя смешно
Dolle naa lost — Пустоголовый

Oio naa elealla alasse’ — Ваш вид радует
Lle naa belegohtar — Вы сильный воин
Lle naa curucuar — Вы искусный стрелок-
Lle naa vanima — Вы прекрасны
Lle ume quel — Вы славно потрудились
Lle maa quel — Хорошо выглядите
Vanimle sila tiri — Ваша красота сияет ярким светом-
Cormlle naa tanya tel’raa — У вас львиное сердце

Amin sinta lle? — Я знаю Вас?
Lle tela? — Вы закончили?
Lle lakwenien? — Вы шутите?
Lle desiel? — Вы готовы?
Malia ten’ (yulna/vasa/fion/laure/sereg)? — Не желаете (выпить/перекусить/вина/мёда/эля)?
Lle (Ron) rangwa (amin)? — Вы (они) понимаете (меня)?
Amin sinta lle? — Я вас знаю?
Lle tyava quel? — Вам хорошо?
Lle anta yulna en alu? — Вам нужен глоток воды?
Lle anta amin tu? — Вам нужна помощь?
Lle vesta? — Вы обещаете?
Lle quena i’lambe tel’ Eldalie? — Вы говорите по-эльфийски?
Lle merna salk? — Не хотите потанцевать?
Lle lava? — Не уступите место?
Sut naa lle (umien) (sina re)? — Как вы (ваши дела) (сегодня)?
Sut an? — Как долго?
Sut? — Как?
An lema? — Длинный путь?
Lle merna aut (farien)? — Мы идём (охотиться)?
Mani naa essa en lle? — Как ваше имя?
Mani naa lle umien? — Что вы делаете?
Mani ume lle quena? — Что вы сказали?
Mani uma lle merna (ten’ ta)? — Что вы хотите (для этого)?
Mani marte? — Что случилось?
Mani nae lle umien? — Что вы делали?
Mani naa ta? — Что это?
Mani naa tanya (nat’)? — Что это (за вещь)?
Mani? — Что?
Lire (lye/lle) auta? — Когда (вы/мы) уезжаете?
Lire? — Когда?
Manke (naa/nae) (lle/llie/lye) (tuulo’)? — Откуда (есть/были) (Вы/вы/мы) (родом)?
Manke (naa/nae) lle? — Где вы (были)?
Manke naa (lye/lle) autien? — Куда (мы/вы) собираетесь?
Manke naa lye omentien? — Где встречаемся?
Manke tanya tuula? — Откуда это взялось?
Manke naa i’omentien? — Где встреча?
Manke? — Где?
Mani er? — Который?
Ya auta yeste’? — Кто ведёт?
Ya (naa/nae) tanya? — Что это (было)?
Ya? — Кто?
Mankoi naa lle sinome? — Почему вы здесь?
Mankoi lle uma tanya? — Зачем вы сделали это?
Mankoi lle irma sint? — Что вы хотите знать?
Mankoi? — Почему?
Вы преуспели – Lle ume elv quel

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